3 Hazards During Warm Winter Weather

by: Jennifer Oldfield

Here in Saskatchewan, well Canada really, it isn’t unusual to have drastic changes in temperature.  Going from -40C one week to +3C the next, can be a common occurance.  Although the warm weather may seem great, there are some disadvantages to having temperatures on the plus side at this time of year.

bambi-iceIce

Plus temperatures during the day and colder temperatures at night mean more sheets of thin ice.  Ice as expected, presents a slipping hazard for everyone, including our pets, and just as we can injury ourselves, so too can they.  The “bambi” slip (where back +/- front legs splay out from underneath) can cause strains to tendons and muscles that can take time to heal.  This may mean requiring medication, rest, and even some massage or rehab work to get back to tip top shape.

How can you prevent this?

Avoid exercising your pet during the hours where frost and ice are forming.  Here in Saskatchewan this can be tough as that may mean only a handful of hours in the day when the frost and ice are melted.

If you can’t avoid these times, go slow.  Be cautious of where you are walking.  Don’t throw toys for retrieving in areas that are most prone to icy sections.

Salt/Ice Melt

sand-truckWith the new layers of ice even more salt/sand mixtures are being applied to roadways and ice melt being applied to walkways.  The salt from the roadway can be harmful to a pet’s paws and can make them sick if they groom it off.  Ice melt, if not pet friendly can also be hard on paws and potentially toxic if they lick it off.

How can you prevent this?

If you can’t avoid it (which at this point is near impossible), wash your pet’s paws off as soon as you get home.  Also be sure if you are using any ice melt products on your walkways, that you are using a pet safe version.

Water

You may be thinking how can water be a hazard.  Think of it this way, when you are out melted-snow
building a snowman and your mitts get wet, what happens to your hands?  They get cold.  Leaving them wet and cold could lead to frostbite or even hypothermia if the rest of your body gets chilled or other parts of you are also wet.  The same holds true for your pets.  Wet paws, fur, and possibly bellies can potentially lead to frostbite or hypothermia.

How can you prevent this?

Again avoiding is the best option although somewhat impractical.  Instead, avoid lengthy periods of time outdoors in areas that have water built up, have your dog wear waterproof booties (provided they are tall enough to not allow water inside the boot), dry feet and underbelly when you arrive home.  If you have driven to your exercise location bring a towel and dry bedding.  Dry your pet’s feet and underbelly and ensure they aren’t laying on wet or damp bedding materials for the ride home.

Have fun but be safe!

Taking advantage of the warmer weather is definitely more enjoyable than staying indoors and avoiding the hazards.  Just take care and caution when out and about.  Ensuring you and your pet are safe and warm will mean you both get to enjoy the best part of warmer winter weather – running and playing in the snow!

snow-play

Photo by Cassandra Lobb

 

 

 

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